Diary October 2017Dance, theatre, Film & exhibition, book

2017-10-02
Culture

DANCE

The Dreamers Ever Leave You

What was once estern Europe's largest printwork is reborn as a vast performance venue, providing the setting for a collaboration between The Royal Ballet and The National Ballet of Canada. Based on the landscaped paintings of Lawren Harris, and with a hypnotic piano score by Lubomyr Melnyk, The Dreamers Ever Leave You features dancers displaying breathtaking power and form. Audience members are allowed to move among the performers in a uniquely liberating experience. On 12th and 13th October at Prinworks London

THEATRE

Young Marx

You might not think there would much light-hearted entertainment to be mined from the political theoretician who conceived of communism - and, ordinarily, you'd probably be right. But Young Marx is created by the team responsible for the brilliant comedy One Man, Two Guvnors - director Nicholas Hytner and writer Richard Bean. Olivier award-winner Rory Kinnear takes the title role in this farce that centres on Marx as a booze-soaked thirtysomething radical, dreaming of revolution while struggling to survive in the underworld of Victorian London. It's worthy first for Bridge Theatre, the South Bank's exciting new venue. From 18th October at the Bridge Theatre

FILM

The Mountain Between Us

Two strangers are thrown together in the most desperate of circumstances and must depend on each other if they are to survive. Starring Kate Winslet as a photojournalist and Idris Elba as a surgeon - the only survivors after their plane crashes in a frozen wilderness - The Mountain Between Us (based on the novel by Charles Martin) is a nerve-jangling adventure. As Winslet displays her capacity for true grit, Elba flexes the cinematic muscles of a true star, the two concoct a compelling chemistry. Opens on 6th October in the UK

Theatre

Venus in Fur

Best known as the imperious Margaery Tyrell in Game Of Thrones, Natalie Dormer shows a very different side to her talents in the deliciously wicked drama-comedy Venus in Fur, seizing with aplomb the part of an actress who will stop at nothing in pursuit of her ambitions. When Vanda Jordan (Dormer) strides into a theatre demanding to be seen by the director, played by David Oakes, he insists she will be entirely wrong for the part of a coolly seductive dominatrix. But it's not long before she proves him wrong. Roles are reversed in a power game that blurs the line between performance and reality to keep the viewer guessing at the truth until the very last moments. From 6th October at Theatre Royal Haymarket

EXHIBITION

Illuminating India

London's Science Museum is marking the 70th anniversary of Indian independence with two new exhibitions. In "5000 Years of Science and Innovation", the focus is on the subcontinent's history of innovation, from the dawn of civilisation to the latest advances in the space race. And "Photography 1857-2017" is a pictorial history, from the turbulent Indian mutiny and the ructions of partition to a burgeoning culture now finding expression in digital imagery. From 4th October at the Science Museum

Harry Potter: A History of Magic

Twenty years on from the publication of the first book in JK Rowling's series, Harry Potter and The Philosopher's Stone, the British Library celebrates the saga that has enthralled children and adults around the world with a suitably magical exhibition. Now you can marvel at the manuscripts in which Harry, Hermione and Hogwarts came to life, as well as the drawings of original illustrator Jim Kay. Also on display are the centuries-old inspirations for Rowling's sorcery, including the mysterious 15th-century alchemy of the dazzling Ripley Scroll, along with enchanting medieval pictures of dragons and phoenixes. From 20th October

BOOK

Uncommon Type

Yes, that's the Tom Hanks. The multi-Oscar-winning actor's talents now extend to writing, and this collection of short stories has already earned him rave reviews in the US. Hanks is an obsessive collector of typewriters, and the machines are the common thread running through these 17 tales. But otherwise there's a rich range of subject matter and emotions here, from an immigrant finding refuge in New York and a divorcee starting life anew to a journey on a home-built space rocket. Then there's the actor who becomes a star overnight and must contend with fame and the press... now where did Hanks find inspiration for that one?

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