Diary October 2016Opera & exhibition

2016-10-04
Culture

EXHIBITION Abstract Expressionism

Rarely has the art world been as shaken up as it was in the 1950s, when the pioneers of Abstract Expressionism created paintings and sculpture that broke with the traditions of the past. Now, the Royal Academy gathers together works by the movement’s leading exponents, including Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko – artists whose creations were of overwhelming size and impact. From 24th September at the Royal Academy of Arts

OPERA Così Fan Tutti

Is true love enough to withstand any temptation? In this Royal Opera debut, German director Jan Philipp Gloger presents Mozart’s mischievous opera about two young couples. Ferrando and Dorabella, and Guglielmo and Fiordiligi, appear besotted and destined for marriage. But a cynical friend of the two men, Don Alfonso, isn’t convinced and bets that each man seduce the other’s girlfriend. As Ferrando and Guglielmo disguise themselves, a comical farce ensues. Gloger’s production cleverly sets the story in a theatre to furnish the deception with all the trickery of stagecraft. Until 19th October at the Royal Opera House

DESIGN MUSEUM

Since 1989, the Design Museum has housed some of the most revered home products, influencing designers and architects alike. On 24th November, it opens at its new location on Kensington High Street in a space three times the size of its previous hub. To mark the move into the renovated Grade II-listed ‘60s building, the museum is opening Designer Maker User – a free permanent gallery celebrating affordable consumer goods. If you are after classic design deserving of hall-of-fame status, you will find it there. From 24th November at the Design Museum

BJARKE INGELS Serpentine Pavilion

Ever since it opened in 1970, the Serpentine Gallery has been a centre for modern art and design. But by far its most ambitious project is the annual Serpentine Pavilion, which invites an architect to construct a temporary gallery in Kensington Gardens for six months. This year, the building is by Danish designer Bjarke Ingels, whose modernist vision has created an ‘unzipped wall’ made from fibreglass frames stacked on top of each other. By night, the space will become an illuminated backdrop for cultural events. Until 9th October in Kensington Gardens

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